Meet This Book: Entering into Rest (O’Donovan, 2017)

So Entering into Rest is about our ends, in all the senses of that word, and how we must foresee them from the start somehow in order to begin anything. I have thought about how our life is punctuated by our ends as points of rest on the way, anticipating the ultimate, and about how our sanctification is a work of God in which we may rest in thanksgiving. I have thought about how we rest in work, in friendship, and in communicating meaning. And I have thought about how we rest in death. And in keeping with my usual incapacity to think about only one thing at a time, I have thought about a great deal else.

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Five Questions with Oliver O’Donovan (O’Donovan, 2015)

How does Ethics as Theology tie into your previous work on the subject of Christian ethics?
What makes your work in these volumes a unique contribution to the field of ethics?
Using ten words (or fewer) per book, can you describe each of the three volumes in the series?
What’s the best advice you can give to aspiring theologians?
What are you reading right now for work, and what are you reading right now that has absolutely nothing to do with your work?

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Communicating the Good: The Politics and Ethics of ‘The Common Good’ (O’Donovan, 2016)

The language of the common good, like the language of property which exemplifies it, is Janus-faced. Looking back it points to a concrete givenness of community, a present and existing form within which we have been given to communicate with others, and which we cannot ignore without great blame. Looking forward, it can invite us to think of a City of God, a sphere of universal community, and encourage us to seek intimations of it from the future. But only so far can it take us. It cannot ease us through the portals of the City of God up the steps of a ladder of dialectical reconciliations.

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Resurrection and the Senses: In Defence of Thomas (O’Donovan, 2016)

The upper room is the scene where faith is given, and as such is as important to God’s victory as the empty tomb. It would not have been enough that the resurrection should simply have happened; that could have had no more meaning than the birth and death of galaxies. It was an event with meaning, a communicative event, and until the meaning is grasped, the communicative purpose was not accomplished. The resurrection changed the way God’s human creatures could grasp hold of their task of living.

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