Perfection and Presence (Kantzer Lectures) (Webster, 2007)

In the inauguration of the Kantzer Lectures series, distinguished Professor John Webster delivers a rich reflection upon the perfections and presence of God. The question at the center of this lectures series is the nature of human fellowship with God. The Investigation of the nature of this fellowship entails for Webster, a comprehension of the divine perfections and their relation to the Trinitarian relations and missions. From the nature of God, the Trinitarian relations and the nature of Divine presence more generally, it can then be understood more clearly what scripture means when it speaks of the Word becoming flesh. Webster offers, therefore, an extensive reflection upon the human history of the divine Word and the nature of his presence in the flesh. Finally, Webster moves to discuss the nature of the resurrected and exalted Lord’s presence, a presence manifest in his Lordship over his creatures and in the practices and Sacraments of the holy church.

Lecture 1: Introduction
Lecture 2: God’s Perfect Life
Lecture 3: God Is Everywhere but Not Only Everywhere
Lecture 4: Immanuel
Lecture 5: The Presence of Christ Exalted
Lecture 6: He Will Be With Them

Why should theological study be a primary occupation for the Christian minister? (Webster, 2014)

In the gospel we find God’s loving instruction of guilty and sad creatures, whose treason against their creator is such that they have lost their way, and no longer know who or where they are or how to reach out to happiness. To these creatures – to us – the gospel holds out illumination and healing.

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‘Rise, heart; thy Lord is risen’ (Webster, 2016)

The Christian confession of the resurrection encompasses two great matters: first, that Jesus Christ is the living one who died and is alive for evermore (Rev. 1.18), and, second, that together with him ‘God made us alive’ (Eph. 2.5). These two elements of the confession – its Christology and its soteriology – belong together, but stand in a strict and irreversible sequence.

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What Makes Theology Theological (Webster, 2015)

An understanding of the nature of theology comprises an account of its object, its cognitive principles, its ends and its practitioners.  The object of theology is two-fold: principally God the Holy Trinity, and derivatively all things in relation to God.  God is considered first absolutely, then relatively; all other things are treated relative to God, under the aspect of creatureliness.  The objective cognitive principle of theology is God’s infinite knowledge, of which God communicates a fitting share to creatures; the subjective cognitive principle of theology is the regenerate human intellect.  The ends of theology are scientific (acquiring the knowledge of the matter which is proper to creatures), contemplative (rapt attention to God the cause of all things) and practical (regulation of the enactment of human life).  The practitioners of theology are regenerate persons in the church whose creaturely intellect is instructed by God and all of whose works are accompanied by the practices of religion.

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